History

Kyoto Joshi Gakuen ("Kyoto Women's Educational Institution") is a comprehensive institution consisting of the graduate school, university, high school, junior high school, elementary school attached to the university, and kindergarten. While these schools and educational institutes were established and have developed independently from each other, they share the same founding philosophy based on the Buddhist principles advocated by Shinran to foster a sincere, benevolent, and unselfish spirit. We celebrated our 100th anniversary in 2011.

Kyoto Joshi Gakuen's origins were inherited from (and incorporate the spirit of) Kendo Jogakuin, established in 1899 by Wariko Kai in cooperation with Jinzaemon Matsuda. In the following year, Wariko and her husband, Komazo, opened a school named Bunchuen. In 1910, it was merged with Kyoto Koto Jogakko ("Kyoto Girls' High School")  run by Zenzo Yabe, under the auspices of the Buddhist Association of Women of Nishi Hongwanji Temple, presided by Kazuko Otani (the spouse of the Nishi Hongwanji Temple Master). That year also marked the establishment of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen.

Komazo Kai  Wariko kai

  • Komazo Kai
  • Wariko kai

In 1912, the "Prospectus for the Establishment of a Women's University" was issued by Takeko Kujo, President of the Buddhist Association of Women, and backed by Nishi Hongwanji Temple. In response, the government gave permission to establish a college for women, and Kyoto Joshi Koto Senmongakko ("Women's Institute of Kyoto") was established in 1920. The enthusiasm for establishing a women's educational institution became a major driving force towards the founding of a women's university under the new educational system, through which, in 1949, the long-held dream of establishing a women's university was finally realized. In 1950, Kyoto Women's Junior College was established and it operated successfully until 2011 when it ceased enrolling students.

Kazuko Otani  Takeko Kujo

  • Kazuko Otani
  • Takeko Kujo

Chronology

1899 Wariko Kai, in cooperation with Jinzaemon Matsuda, establishes Kendo Jogakuin in Hanayacho, Higashinakasuji-dori, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto. (This marks the origins of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen.)
1900
Wariko and her husband, Komazo, open a school in Samegai Gojo, Kyoto. Named Bunchuen, the school follows through with the objectives and founding principles of Kendo Jogakuin.
Kazuko Otani  Takeko Kujo
  • Kazuko Otani
  • Takeko Kujo
1910
The school changes its name to Kyoto Koto Jogakko (Kyoto Girls' High School). Thanks to the efforts of Kazuko Otani (the spouse of the Nishi Hongwanji Temple Master) and Takeko Kujo (President of the Buddhist Association of Women), the school is chartered under the Girls' High School Act and relocates to the premises of Honkokuji Temple in Kakimoto-cho, Horikawa Gojo, Kyoto. (This year marks the formal establishment of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen.)
Main gate of Kyoto Koto Jogakko

Main gate of Kyoto Koto Jogakko

1911 Kyoto Shogyo Jogakko (Kyoto Girls' Commerce School) is established on the same premises. This school subsequently becomes Kyoto Saiho Jogakko (Kyoto Girls' Needlework School).
1912 Takeko Kujo and others issue the "Prospectus for the Establishment of a Women's University."
1914
The campus is relocated from Horikawa Gojo to Imakumano (current location).
After moving to the current location in 1914

After moving to the current location in 1914

1917 Kyoto Yochien (Kyoto Kindergarten) is established.
1920 Kyoto Joshi Koto Senmongakko (Women's Institute of Kyoto), the predecessor of Kyoto Women's University, is established.
1924
On her visit, Empress Teimei (consort of Emperor Taisho and younger sister of Kazuko Otani) remarks that "This school is a warm and delightful school of the spirit." Since then, Kyoto Joshi Gakuen has been called a "school of the spirit."
The school receives a visit from Empress Teimei

The school receives a visit from Empress Teimei

1930 Honpa Hongwanji Hobo Yoseijo (Hongwanji Childminder Training School) is established on the same premises.
1944 The school foundation changes its name to the Ryukoku Joshi Gakuen Foundation and becomes the establishing entity of Joshi Koto Senmongakko, Koto Jogakko, Saiho Jogakko, and Hobo Yoseijo.
Kyoto Joshi Koto Senmongakko changes its name to Kyoto Joshi Senmongakko.
Kyoto Saiho Jogakko is disestablished; Kyoto Joshi Shogyogakko (Kyoto Girls' School of Commerce) is established.
Honpa Hongwanji Hobo Yoseijo changes its name to Kyoto Hobo Yoseijo.
1947 Kyoto Joshi Chugakko (Kyoto Girls' Junior High School) is established.
1948 Kyoto Koto Jogakko and Kyoto Joshi Shogyogakko are disestablished; Kyoto Joshi Kotogakko (Kyoto Girls' Senior High School) is established.
1949
Kyoto Hobo Yoseijo is disestablished.
Kyoto Women's University is established, comprising the Faculty of Arts (Department of Japanese Language and Literature, Department of English Studies, Department of Chinese History and Literature) and the Faculty of Home Economics (Department of Food, Department of Apparel, Department of Pedology). A ceremony is held to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen.
A class in the early days of the university

A class in the early days of the university

1950 Kyoto Women's Junior College is established (offering a Japanese Course and an English Course in the Arts Department and a Food Course and an Apparel Course in the Home Economics Department).
The university's Department of Chinese History and Literature is disestablished; the Department of Oriental History is established.
1951 The establishing entity of the schools is changed from the Ryukoku Joshi Gakuen Foundation to the Kyoto Joshi Gakuen Educational Foundation.
Kyoto Joshi Senmongakko is disestablished.
An evening program is added to the Arts Department and Home Economics Department in the junior college.
1954 The junior college evening program is disestablished. An evening program is added to the university's Faculty of Arts (Department of Japanese Language and Literature, Department of English Studies) and Faculty of Home Economics (Department of Food, Department of Apparel).
A kindergarten teacher training school (affiliated with the university) is established.
1956 The Department of Elementary Education is established in the university's Faculty of Arts; the Elementary Education Department is established in the junior college.
1957
The kindergarten teacher training school (affiliated with the university) is disestablished.
The Elementary School Attached to Kyoto Women's University is established.
Construction is completed on the elementary school building (now Building D).
The elementary school's first entrance ceremony in 1957

The elementary school's first entrance ceremony in 1957

1959 Construction is completed on a special junior high school building (now Building 21).
1960 A ceremony is held to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen.
1961 The first phase of construction is completed on the senior high school buildings.
Construction is completed on Building Q of the university/junior college.
1962 Construction is completed on Kinkaryo Dormitory.
The second phase of construction is completed on the senior high school buildings.
1964 The university's Department of Elementary Education (Faculty of Arts) is reorganized into the Department of Education, comprising the Elementary Education Course and Music Education Course.
Construction is completed on Building B of the university/junior college.
1966
The Graduate School is established, comprising the Graduate School of Literature (Japanese Language and Literature Course, Oriental History Course [4-person courses]) and Graduate School of Home Economics (Pedology Course [6-person course]).
Construction is completed on Hokoku Field.
The third phase of construction is completed on the senior high school buildings.
Construction is completed on Building E of the university/junior college.
Construction is completed on the junior high school building (now Building 22).
Construction is completed on Hiyoshiryo Dormitory.
A seminar at the graduate school in the mid 1960s

A seminar at the graduate school in the mid 1960s

1967 The Food Course (6-person course) is added to the Graduate School of Home Economics.
Construction is completed on Building C of the university/junior college.
1968 The evening program of the university's Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Home Economics is disestablished.
An English Language and Literature Course (4-person course) is added to the Graduate School of Literature; an Apparel Course (6-person course) is added to the Graduate School of Home Economics.
Student enrollment capacity is expanded from 40 to 80 students per grade to enable the elementary school to make two classes per grade.
1969 A unified 6-year education system is introduced, covering junior to senior high school.
1970 A ceremony is held to commemorate the 60th anniversary of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen.
1972 Construction is completed on Komatsuryo Dormitory.
1973 Construction is completed on the junior high/senior high gymnasium, administration building, and sub-hall.
Construction is completed on the junior high school building.
1974 Construction is completed on the kindergarten building.
Construction is completed on Buildings L and A of the university/junior college.
1976 Student enrollment capacity is changed for the university and junior college.
Construction is completed on the elementary school building.
1978 Construction is completed on the laboratory building (Toryo Hall).
1980 A ceremony is held to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen.
Construction is completed on the gymnasium and Building M (music hall) of the university/junior college.
1986 The elementary school's second field is opened.
1987 Construction is completed on Building G (arts and crafts hall) of the university/junior college.
1990
A development plan is finalized and construction of facilities is completed for the Oharano Campus (Kyoto Women's University and Junior College Multipurpose Field).
A ceremony is held to commemorate the 80th anniversary of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen.
Bird's-eye view of the Oharano Campus

Bird's-eye view of the Oharano Campus

1991 In the junior college, the Arts Department (Japanese Course, English Course) changes its name to the Literature Department (Japanese Language and Literature Course, English Language and Literature Course); the Elementary Education Department changes its name to the Department of Elementary Education; and the Home Economics Department (Food Course, Apparel Course) changes its name to the Department of Family and Consumer Science (Food and Nutrition Course, Apparel and Space Design Course).
1992 Construction is completed on Buildings J and K of the university/junior college.
1993 The university's Department of Oriental History (Faculty of Arts) is reorganized into the Department of History, while the Department of Apparel (Faculty of Home Economics) is reorganized into the Department of Apparel and Space Design. The Department of Food (Faculty of Home Economics) changes its name to the Department of Food and Nutrition.
1995 A master's course in Education is added to the Graduate School of Literature.
1997 In the Graduate School of Literature, a doctoral course in Education is added, while the Oriental History Course is reorganized into the History Course.
1999 A doctoral course in History is added to the Graduate School of Literature.
2000 Student enrollment capacity is changed for the university and junior college. The Department for the Study of Contemporary Society, Faculty for the Study of Contemporary Society is established in the university.
Construction is completed on Kinkaden Hall and Building S of the university/junior college.
A ceremony is held to commemorate the 90th anniversary of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen.
2001 In the Graduate School of Literature, a doctoral course in Japanese Language and Literature, a doctoral course in English Language and Literature, and a master's course in the Integration of Human Expression and Behavior are added. In the Graduate School of Home Economics, the Apparel Course is reorganized into the Apparel and Space Design Course.
The Mental Health Counseling Room is opened in the graduate school.
The Imakumanoryo Dormitory is opened.
2002 An increase is made in the number of students eligible for the admission-via-recommendation system for children going from kindergarten to elementary school.
2003 Student enrollment capacity for the junior high school is increased from 600 to 720; the enrollment capacity for the senior high school is reduced accordingly.
The II S Course is established in the junior high school.
2004 A master's course is established in Public Spheres Studies, Graduate School of Studies in Contemporary Society.
A doctoral course in Living Environment is added to the Graduate School of Home Economics.
The Department of Education (Faculty of Arts) and Department of Pedology (Faculty of Home Economics) are reorganized into the Faculty of Human Development and Education, comprising the Department of Education (Education Course, Psychology Course, Music Education Course) and the Department of Pedology.
The Department of Living and Welfare is added to the Faculty of Home Economics.
Student enrollment capacity is increased for the Food and Nutrition Department and the Department of Apparel and Space Design in the Faculty of Home Economics. The Faculty starts accepting inter-university transfers.
The junior college ceases enrolling students in the Food and Nutrition Course, Family and Consumer Science Department. Student enrollment capacity is reduced for the Literature Department (Japanese Language and Literature Course, English Language and Literature Course). The Department of Family and Consumer Science is renamed the Department of Apparel and Space Design and its enrollment capacity is reduced.
2006 The Graduate School of Human Development and Education is established, comprising the Education Course (master's and doctoral courses), Psychology Course (master's course), Integration of Human Expression and Behavior Course (master's course), and Pedology (master's course).
A master's course in Living and Welfare Management is added to the Graduate School of Home Economics.
A doctoral course in Public Spheres Studies is added to the Graduate School of Studies in Contemporary Society.
The Wisteria Course is established in the junior high school.
2008 University Nutrition Clinic opened.
2009 The Food Course in the Graduate School of Home Economics changes its name to the Food and Nutrition Course.
A specialized course called the Wisteria Course is established in the senior high school.
2010 A ceremony is held to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen.
The junior college ceases to enroll students.
2011 Student enrollment capacity is changed for the university. The Department of Law, Faculty of Law is established in the university.
Construction is completed on the Umamachi Bicycle Garage and Buildings F and Y of the university/junior college.
The kindergarten is relocated to a newly constructed building.
2012 Construction is completed on the University Research Building R.
2013 The Osaka Office is opened.
Construction is completed on the University U Building (childhood education building).

School Emblems

The emblems for each school feature a hanging wisteria, a symbol of the Jodo Shinshu Hongwanji-ha temple. The design of the light purple wisteria bowing its head is said to be reminiscent of a courteous woman.

Symbol of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen (former Gakuen emblem)

Symbol of Kyoto Joshi Gakuen
(former Gakuen emblem)

Kyoto Joshi Gakuen

Kyoto Joshi Gakuen

Kyoto Women's Graduate School, University, and Junior College

Kyoto Women's Graduate School,
University, and Junior College

Kyoto Women's High School

Kyoto Women's High School

Kyoto Women's Junior High School

Kyoto Women's Junior High School

Elementary School Affiliated with Kyoto Women's University

Elementary School Affiliated with
Kyoto Women's University

Kyoto Kindergarten

Kyoto Kindergarten

Kyoto Kindergarten Symbol

Kyoto Kindergarten Symbol


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